Family questions shooting at Houston hospital; Missouri Supreme Court rules wrongful death case can't proceed against hospital;

News from Around the Web

> Family members are now questioning why an off-duty officer shot Alan Pean in Houston's St. Joseph Medical Center, KHOU.com reports. Article

> Bystander CPR has been linked to a 30 percent lower risk of nursing home admission and brain damage in survivors of cardiac arrest outside hospital in research presented at ESC Congress. Announcement

> The Missouri Supreme Court has decided that wrongful death litigation can't proceed against a northwest Missouri hospital. Judges cited statute of limitations in their ruling, according to FOX2now. Article

Health Payer News

> Alaska Gov. Bill Walker has scored a victory in his showdown with the state's legislature over Medicaid expansion, the Washington Post reports. After facing opposition to his plan to expand Medicaid, Walker, an independent, had announced that he would bypass the legislature to expand the program; state lawmakers countered by suing Walker last week. But Friday, a Superior Court Judge denied their request to issue a temporary order to block Medicaid enrollment, according to the Post. Article

> For years, health insurance companies have claimed that Medicare Advantage (MA) can provide better care at a lower cost. But is this really the case? It's hard to say, Wendell Potter writes in a post for the Center for Public Integrity. His reason: Neither the federal government nor insurers who operate MA plans will make cost-related data available. Article

And finally... Parks and Meh-creation.  Article

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