Department of Health and Human Services Honors Children’s Hospital Los Angeles Liver Transplant Program With Prestigious A

Children’s Hospital Los Angeles is the Only Hospital in the Region Recognized in Liver Transplant

LOS ANGELES--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- Children’s Hospital Los Angeles’ Liver Transplant Program was honored last week at the Sixth National Learning Congress where it received a prestigious Bronze Award from the Department of Health and Human Services. The Nov. 3 award ceremony in Grapevine, Texas, acknowledged exceptional hospitals, programs and individuals from across the nation in the areas of donation and transplantation. Children’s Hospital Los Angeles was the only hospital in the region, including California, Nevada, New Mexico and Utah, recognized for excellence in liver transplantation.

More than 700 individual transplant programs were analyzed by the Health Resources and Services Administration, which looked at exceptional outcomes in one of three areas: one-year post transplant survival rates, deceased donor transplantation rates and waitlist mortality rates. Twenty-one percent of the programs analyzed met the criteria in at least one area. Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, which treats a high number of challenging patient cases, was recognized for having significantly lower-than-expected patient mortality rate while on the transplant waitlist and excellent patient outcomes in liver transplantations.

“This award is a tribute to the excellence that is fostered at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles,” said Yuri Genyk, MD, Surgical Director of Liver and Small Bowel Transplant at the hospital. “The decrease in pre-transplant mortality is mainly due to our active living donor transplant program, which is a major step forward in managing children with end stage liver disease in an environment where there is a shortage of deceased donor organs.”

The Liver Transplant Program at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles is the largest pediatric living donor center in California. Since opening in 1998, the Liver Transplant Program has performed 188 liver transplants, of which 83 were from a live donor (a healthy person who donates a segment of his or her liver). Children’s Hospital Los Angeles has performed more than 43 percent of the state’s pediatric living donor transplants since the Program was established.

About Children’s Hospital Los Angeles

Founded in 1901, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles is one of the nation’s leading children’s hospitals and is acknowledged worldwide for its leadership in pediatric and adolescent health. Children’s Hospital Los Angeles is one of only seven children’s hospitals in the nation – and the only children’s hospital on the West Coast – ranked for two consecutive years in all 10 pediatric specialties in the U.S. News & World Report rankings and named to the magazine’s “Honor Roll” of children’s hospitals. The Saban Research Institute at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles is among the largest and most productive pediatric research facilities in the United States, with 100 investigators at work on 186 laboratory studies, clinical trials and community-based research and health services. The Saban Research Institute is ranked eighth in National Institutes of Health funding among children’s hospitals in the United States. Children’s Hospital Los Angeles is a premier teaching hospital and has been affiliated with the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California since 1932.



CONTACT:

Children’s Hospital Los Angeles
Lyndsay Lagree, 323-361-4121
[email protected]

KEYWORDS:   United States  North America  California

INDUSTRY KEYWORDS:   Surgery  Health  Hospitals

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