CPPR Releases National Ad Outlining Dangers of IPAB

WASHINGTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- The Coalition to Protect Patients' Rights (CPPR) is up today with a $1.4 million television ad buy that will be featured on national cable and targeted local broadcast stations discussing the dangers of the Affordable Care Act’s Independent Payment Advisory Board (IPAB). You can see the ad here.

“I believe it is vital that Americans become educated on the harmful effect the Independent Payment Advisory Board is expected to have on medical care available to seniors throughout the United States,” former president of the American Medical Association and current spokesman of CPPR, Dr. Donald Palmisano said.

Dr. Palmisano continued, “In addition to cutting over $500 billion from Medicare to pay for their new law, the Affordable Care Act’s authors added insult to injury by creating this unaccountable cost-cutting board that will have almost no oversight and the power to cut billions from the Medicare program every year. I want to encourage patients and doctors to contact their elected representatives and demand that IPAB be repealed before the quality of seniors’ medical care is further diminished.”

Starting in 2015, the Independent Payment Advisory Board (IPAB) – a 15-member panel of unelected bureaucrats – will be empowered to make cuts to the Medicare program every year in which spending exceeds targeted growth rates. IPAB’s recommended cuts will become law unless a supermajority in Congress vetoes the board’s proposal and creates its own cost-cutting plan of equal size. There is no administrative or legal appeal available to citizens.

Support for the repeal of IPAB is broad and bipartisan. More than 72 House Democrats signed a letter to then-Speaker Nancy Pelosi asking her to remove IPAB from the original health care legislation and in June a letter signed by 270 health care groups was sent to the Hill urging Members to repeal IPAB. Even the American Medical Association, a vocal proponent of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act before its passage, recently announced its opposition to IPAB.

The Coalition to Protect Patients' Rights supports a full repeal of IPAB to ensure American patients have continued access to quality health care.

The full script:

Narrator: Do you remember when they said…

Nancy Pelosi: We have to pass the bill so that you can find out what is in it.

Narrator: Well, we found out—and it’s bad.

Narrator: After cutting 500 billion from Medicare, the president’s health care law created a new law of 15 unelected bureaucrats—unaccountable, like a Medicare IRS with the power to cut payments to doctors and deny seniors care to pay for more wasteful Washington spending.

Narrator: Tell Washington bureaucrats shouldn’t have the power to deny seniors care.

About the Coalition to Protect Patients’ Rights: The Coalition to Protect Patients' Rights is a non-partisan, grassroots coalition made up of over 10,000 doctors, health care providers, advocacy groups, and concerned citizens who are dedicated to the implementation of patient-centered health care reform that will improve patient care. For more information, visit the Coalition to Protect Patients’ Rights website at www.protectpatientsrights.org. Also, check out CPPR’s Facebook account here, and its Twitter feed at PatientsNOW.



CONTACT:

Coalition to Protect Patients' Rights (CPPR)
703-405-9407
[email protected]

KEYWORDS:   United States  North America  District of Columbia

INDUSTRY KEYWORDS:   Seniors  Entertainment  TV and Radio  Health  Public Policy/Government  Healthcare Reform  Public Policy  White House/Federal Government  Professional Services  Insurance  Consumer  General Health

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