Chronic pain costs up to $635B each year; Hospitals compete for cancer patients with multi-million-dollar centers;

> Healthcare facilities may need to rethink how they treat chronic pain, suggest data from the Institute of Medicine. Chronic pain affects 116 million Americans and results in healthcare and economic costs of $560 billion to $635 billion a year, according to the IOM study. Study

> Hospitals are trying to cut costs by eliminating unnecessary tests and treatments, although some doctors didn't seem to get that memo. A national survey of 1,200 U.S. primary-care doctors found that that nearly half said they would recommend mammography screenings to terminally ill women, even though there is almost no chance those patients would benefit, reports Reuters. Article

> Hospitals in Ohio are racing to attract cancer patients via plans for million-dollar cancer centers, reports the Dayton Daily News. Miami Valley Hospital and Kettering Medical Center are trying to capture the cancer care population, which is expected to include more than 4,000 people in Montgomery and Greene counties in 2012. Article

> Eastern Long Island Hospital in Greenport, N.Y., is the latest hospital to go "smoke free," reports the Long Island Business News. Hospital officials implemented the smoking ban to promote good health habits and discourage behaviors that increase health risks. Article

> Just months after acquiring a three-hospital system in Pennsylvania, Community Health Systems (NYSE: CYH) has decided to sell two of its hospitals in Oklahoma, the hospital operator announced Tuesday. The hospitals will be sold to Ardent Health Services. Press Release

And Finally... They say lightning never strikes twice...unless you're a woman. Article

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