CEO of Evive Health Calls “Personal Accountability” the Key to the Success of Healthcare Reform

CHICAGO--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- As the United States Supreme Court this month hears arguments involving the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, one industry leader believes that “personal accountability” may ultimately be the driver in the success or failure of any healthcare-related reform.

“Regardless of how the Supreme Court rules on the individual mandate, America will not really get its healthcare shop in order until people realize that everyone has a personal, financial and societal responsibility to do what they can to make the healthcare system work better,” said Peter Saravis, CEO of Evive Health. “That means acknowledging that this notion that everyone has an unlimited right to healthcare without also having some accountability for their own lifestyle and health habits is simply not sustainable.”

Saravis believes that real change will occur when people not only accept personal responsibility but when they are equipped with the knowledge and tools necessary to make informed healthcare decisions. “Providing access to care is obviously important, but it is not enough unless people have the information and motivation to change behavior and take action,” he says. “More than any governmental legislation or political intervention, providing people with the information and tools they need to make intelligent decisions regarding health and lifestyle habits for themselves and their families is the greatest consumer protection of all.”

Toward that end, an increasing number of employers and health plans routinely offer affordable health, fitness and wellness programs to help Americans get healthier, manage chronic disease and lower health costs. An industry frustration however is that not enough people participate in these programs, which Saravis attributes to “a myriad of reasons including lack of time, feelings of being overwhelmed, low education or health literacy levels, cultural or logistical issues, poor health, or an inability to understand the value of preventive services.”

To overcome these barriers Saravis says that employers and health plans need to not only provide information regarding health and access to programs, but must become smarter and more creative in how they engage their employees or members to truly participate. Fortunately, he says, there are now proven-effective methods to help motivate people to take action. “And when they do, studies have shown a significant increase in employee health and an equally significant decrease in employers’ healthcare costs,” says Saravis.

“We as a society should be concerned with maintaining and improving ongoing health rather than just treating episodic illness,” he continues. “If you look at some of the most common causes of death in the United States – lung cancer, coronary disease, AIDS, diabetes, respiratory disease, pneumonia − you realize how many of these could be greatly affected, and in some cases controlled, not by more healthcare legislation but through a heightened awareness on the part of consumers and a thoughtful and intelligent change in lifestyle.”

About Evive Health

Evive Health is the leading innovator in designing personalized communication tools that motivate individuals to engage in health and wellness enhancement activities that improve their health, lower healthcare costs, and lead to a happier and healthier lifestyle. For more information, visit http://www.evivehealth.com or call 312-374-9150.



CONTACT:

for Evive Health
Ross Goldberg
818-597-8453, x-1
[email protected]

KEYWORDS:   United States  North America  Illinois

INDUSTRY KEYWORDS:   Seniors  Women  Health  Fitness & Nutrition  Other Health  Professional Services  Insurance  Consumer  General Health  Men

MEDIA:

Logo
 Logo

Suggested Articles

The profit margins and management of Community Health Group raise questions about oversight of managed care insurers.

Financial experts are warning practices about the pitfalls of promoting medical credit cards to their patients.

A proposed rule issued by HHS on Tuesday would expand short-term coverage, a move Seema Verma said will have "virtually no impact" on ACA premiums.