Case study: Swedish Medical markets to medical tourists

Hospitals across the U.S. are beginning to realize that India and other foreign markets may soon begin to drain away meaningful amounts of their business. Fortunately, medical tourism can move in the other direction too, bringing cash-bearing foreign visitors over to our shores for treatment here.

At Seattle's Swedish Medical Center, execs are particularly focused on capturing the attention of potential medical tourists. The hospital has launched a program designed specifically to grow its roster of foreign patients, particularly full-charge self-pay patients from Japan and China. In so doing, it's competing with high-profile providers like the Cleveland Clinic and Johns Hopkins Hospital, both of which have international marketing programs in place.

At Swedish, only $7 million to $8 million of its annual $1.2 billion in revenue comes from international patients at present. However, it has much bigger hopes. To grow that base, Swedish hopes to set up consulting relationships with Chinese and Japanese providers, largely as a means of establishing credibility in those markets.

To learn more about Swedish's medical tourism marketing:
- read this Modern Healthcare article

Related Articles:
Florida public hospital goes five-star route. Report
It's the price, stupid. Editorial
Trend: Mexican nursing homes see U.S. influx. Report
Texas patients choosing Mexican hospitals. Article
Critics won over by medical tourism options. Article
Patients, employers choose overseas care. Report
Medical tourism or global healthcare? Report
Indian Hospital uses YouTube to sell medical tourists. Report

Suggested Articles

The profit margins and management of Community Health Group raise questions about oversight of managed care insurers.

Financial experts are warning practices about the pitfalls of promoting medical credit cards to their patients.

A proposed rule issued by HHS on Tuesday would expand short-term coverage, a move Seema Verma said will have "virtually no impact" on ACA premiums.