Antitrust legislation for health insurers now the big reform issue

In an attempt to get some sort of a win out of the seemingly lost health reform situation, House Democrats now are looking to reverse antitrust legislation for insurance companies. Those steps, however, appear to be the only ones being taken in what once was considered to be the most important issue facing America, the Wall Street Journal reports. 

By repealing antitrust laws for health insurers, the hope is to reduce insurance prices in areas where one insurer gets the bulk of patients' business. Overall though, Democrats appear to be backing off of the notion of health reform, as a whole. 

"Don't pin me down as to days or number of weeks," Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) said in regards to getting reform passed, who added that the plan is to get something done this year. 

Several groups--including the AARP and the AMA--want the health reform efforts to continue. They feel that the more the issue gets pushed to the back burner, the more it ultimately will be forgotten completely. 

Some Democrats believe that reconciliation--in which the House would have to pass the version of the reform bill passed by the Senate on Dec. 24 with a few "modifications"--is the best chance for something to get done. 

For more information:
- here's the Wall Street Journal article

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