ACOs in Florida join forces in new association; Cleveland Clinic, Mayo among 'most admired' institutions for IT use;

News From Around the Web

> Ill treatment of older adults--such as financial exploitation, psychological abuse and caregiver neglect--is associated with higher hospitalization rates, concluded a study published yesterday in JAMA Internal Medicine. Abstract

> In Florida, 12 accountable care organizations have formed the Florida Association of ACOs to share ideas and best practices, the group announced Friday. Announcement

> The lawsuit against Corning Hospital and Guthrie Healthcare System in Elmira, N.Y., over unsafe injection practices now includes 59 patients, WETM 18 News reported. That's up from 14 patients who filed the suit about two weeks ago. Article

> Over the weekend, nurses rallied outside of Merrimack Valley Hospital in Haverhill, Mass., to protest what they call dangerous staffing levels at local hospitals run by Steward Health Care and Cerebus Capital Management, reported the Eagle-Tribune. Steward maintains the rally was more about paychecks than patient care. Article

Health IT News

> Five hospital systems were listed by senior executives in all industries as being among the most admired companies using IT to build a competitive advantage, according to a recent report published by Gartner. The list included Cleveland Clinic, Hospital Corporation of America, Intermountain Healthcare, Kaiser Permanente and Mayo Clinic. Article

> The U.S. Department of Health & Human Services' Health Resources and Services Administration on Friday released a final rule on consolidating two databanks that track questionable physician practices. Article

And Finally… Smaller plates, smaller kids. Article

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