8 most unhealthy healthcare jobs

Anesthesiologists have the most unhealthy healthcare job in the nation, according to a survey of jobs across muliple industries, including healthcare.

Business Insider based its rankings of unhealthiest jobs in America on data from the U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Information Network, a detailed database of occupational statistics. Here, in order from least unhealthy to most unhealthy, are the eight healthcare jobs that made the list. 

  • Radiologists (No. 24 on the full BI list): Radiology departments can expose workers to radiation as well as infectious diseases. These employees also spend a lot of time sitting.
  • Nuclear medicine technologists (No. 23): These workers also get exposed to radiation and infectious disease, as well as toxic contaminants.
  • Critical care nurses (No. 21): Nurses are at risk for exposure to infectious diseases, exposure to contaminants and radiation, as well. Also, nurses are increasingly at risk for workplace violence from patients who are intoxicated or combative, as well as falls, accidents and lifting injuries. 
  • Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) and paramedics (No.17): These workers are exposed to the same risks as nursing personnel with added environmental risks, including "minor burns, cuts, bites and stings."
  • Medical equipment preparers (No.12): Health risks include exposure to radiation and contaminants, as well as hazardous working conditions.
  • Surgical and medical assistants, technologists, and technicians (No. 10): The top three risks for these workers include exposures to disease and infections, radiation and contaminants and exposure to hazardous conditions.
  • Podiatrists (No. 5): Exposure to infections and diseases, radiation and contaminants.
  • Anesthesiologists, nurse anesthetists and anesthesiologist assistants (No. 3): Again, these workers face exposure to radiation and contaminants, as well as infections and diseases.

These health risks, combined with the fact that healthcare workers suffer from chronic lifestyle-related diseases like diabetes, obesity and high blood pressure at only slightly lower rates than the general population, mean that healthcare workers can face unique wellness challenges. In addition, they are at significantly higher risk for hepatitis C than the general population. They face numerous physical hazards as well, with a recent analysis determining that nursing assistants are more likely to be injured on the job than construction workers.

To learn more:
- read the Business Insider article

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