Healthcare employers optimistic on hiring, pay raises in 2015

Healthcare organizations will include pay hikes in their 2015 budgets, as well as several other ideas to recruit new talent, according to a survey from CareerBuilder.

In a nationwide survey conducted in late 2014, CareerBuilder questionned 315 employers, human resource professionals and hiring managers within the healthcare industry and 460 healthcare workers about their hiring plans. They found that 47 percent of employers intend to hire temporary or contract workers in the new year. More than half of that percentage said they would hire them on a permanent basis.

Confidence in the future was widespread among respondents, with 78 percent saying their organization was on better financial footing compared to a year ago. Other highlights from the report: 

  • Nearly 50 percent of respondents believe their organization will raise the minimum wage in 2015, of which 15 percent anticipate it will increase by at least $5.

  • A majority of employers in the healthcare field plan to recruit new talent directly out of college, with 65 percent planning to hire recent college graduates in 2015 and 47 percent planning to hire interns. Eighteen percent of respondents said they will hire more recent college graduates than they did in 2014.

  • A slight majority of respondents (52 percent) plan to hire and train workers without industry experience.

Not all recruitment news is good, however; a slight majority (54 percent) of respondents believe a disparity exists between candidates' skills and the skills the organization seeks for certain positions. Forty-six percent of respondents' organizations have open positions they have been unable to fill with qualified applicants, and 48 percent of employers have vacancies that stay open for at least 12 weeks.

To learn more:
- here's the survey announcement

 

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