Value of voice recognition technology for EHRs growing

Are voice recognition systems growing out of their infancy? That's the suggestion made by Dr. Eric Fishman, writing a post for Medscape Business of Medicine. Fishman suggests that while not perfect, voice recognition software solves many of the problems physicians have with electronic health records.

"Clicking through a database to provide exactly the type of data requested is very time consuming and arduous," he writes. "It takes physicians' attention away from patients in most instances, and may not add as much to the readability of a medical record as might be requested." 

In contrast, using speech recognition software allows doctors to maintain eye contact and minimize attention paid to a computer screen. The technology, however, is not without its glitches, as it can be difficult to use with mobile EHR systems, a major reason why mobile technology is used more for data viewing as opposed to data input.

Fishman recommends that physicians review their voice recognition-generated notes and make corrections as required. They also should consider using voice recognition, not for an entire patient record, but in combination with a drop-down list and then dictating a few sentences of a patient's history in their own words. 

To learn more:
- read the Medscape Business of Medicine article

Related Articles:
Nuance, UPMC partner to develop new method of EHR documentation
Microsoft tests mobile speech search
Epocrates to add speech recognition to its mobile EMR
Saving healthcare with the clinical narrative

Suggested Articles

Roche, which already owned a 12.6% stake in Flatiron Health, has agreed to buy the health IT company for $1.9 billion.

Allscripts managed to acquire two EHR platforms for just $50 million by selling off a portion of McKesson's portfolio for as much as $235 million.

Artificial intelligence could help physicians predict a patient's risk of developing a deadly infection.