NextGen hospital solutions parent will not develop tool to meet MU Stage 3

ehr

Harris Computer Corporation, the new parent company of NextGen Healthcare’s hospital electronic health record product, has opted not to develop the system to meet the requirements of Stage 3 of the Meaningful Use program, according to an article in the Powell (Wyoming) Tribune.

Harris, which owns and already operates EHR system QuadraMed, purchased the NextGen Hospital Solutions Division last September after it was announced that the division would be closing, bringing to Harris 50 new hospital clients on the NextGen system. However, Harris confirmed that while it will support the NextGen system for day-to-day issues, it will not update the system to meet Stage 3, in part because it’s unknown what requirements will be needed and what Stage 3 will look like

Harris has offered to install QuadraMed in hospitals that are currently using NextGen at the cost of installation. However, that cost is still $800,000, plus another $225,000 a year for support, maintenance and updates.

The situation puts providers using NextGen, such as Powell Valley Hospital, in a predicament. The hospital had spent $2 million to get its NextGen EHR up and running, only to find out in June that the system’s new owners won’t be making the Stage 3 updates. Powell has already attested to Meaningful Use in the past, and is unsure about the penalties it might occur for not meeting Stage 3, according to the article.  

The problem is compounded for Powell, since its affiliated ambulatory care clinics are still on NextGen’s ambulatory EHR system, which was not sold.

Harris has suggested that affected hospitals consider filing for a hardship exemption while they consider their next steps.   

To learn more:
- read the article

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