Epic, Cerner most popular new EHRs for large hospitals in 2012

Epic and Cerner combined captured more than three-fourths of new large hospital (200-bed plus) electronic health record system contracts in 2012, according to a recently published report from Orem, Utah-based research firm KLAS.

According to the report's authors, the HITECH Act "drastically" changed the acute-care EHR market, with mainstays like GE Healthcare and QuadraMed pretty much out of the picture. Allscripts, Meditech and Siemens were being "squeezed out," with each losing more hospitals in 2012 than they gained.

Epic recorded the most new hospital contracts for the fifth year in a row, while Cerner recorded the second most. Both companies scored high in their systems' breadth of integrated portfolio and physician usability, each of which were attributes deemed very attractive to hospitals.

The report noted, however, that the EHR large hospital market remains active; of nearly 1,500 large hospitals, 443 still have no EHR or are running legacy systems that, at some point, may need to be replaced. Moreover, 39 percent of multi-hospital systems have "heterogeneous environments," and may opt to standardize to one EHR system in the future.

"Since Meaningful Use became a reality, Cerner and Epic have captured a large majority of new hospital contracts," the report's executive summary stated. "However, there are still many decisions to be made in coming years and the remaining market is potentially more competitive than in years past."

The report mirrors other studies that predict that more providers will switch from their existing EHRs and that the EHR vendor market will shrink in the next few years.

To learn more:
- access the report

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