Certified Technology Comparison task force, Joint Health IT Committee meetings set for next week; Jonathan Bush administers CPR to heart attack victim;

News From Around the Web

> Federal Advisory Committee meetings on the agenda for next week include a gathering of the Certified Technology Comparison Task Force on Tuesday, Jan. 19 (the group's fourth meeting this month), and a Joint Health IT Committee collaboration on Wednesday, Jan. 20.

> Athenahealth CEO Jonathan Bush administered CPR to a man who suffered an apparent heart attack in San Francisco earlier this week, MedCity News reports. Article

Provider News

> Warning that major outbreaks of infectious disease can cost the world economy more than $60 billion per year, an independent national commission recommends a global investment of about $4.5 billion annually to better prevent, detect and prepare for possible pandemics. Article

> Amid growing concerns about medical errors, the nation's third-leading cause of death, Twitter could serve as a tool to collect data and improve patient engagement on the subject, according to a study published in the Journal of Patient Safety. Article

Health Insurance News

> Newly elected Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards has signed an executive order that will expand Medicaid coverage in his state under the Affordable Care Act, fulfilling a campaign promise set by the only Democratic governor in the Deep South. Article

> Though recent financial news for health insurers has been less than upbeat, the CEOs of Anthem and Aetna were optimistic about both their 2016 outlook and the individual market during presentations at the JP Morgan Healthcare Conference Tuesday in San Francisco. Article

And Finally... Bird droppings have meet their match. Article

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