Black Book: Allscripts edges out Epic in large hospital market

Allscripts is the top ranked EHR vendor for large hospitals and academic medical centers, according to the latest report from market research firm Black Book Rankings.

The company's study of over 1,900 users in hospitals with 300 or more beds over a five month period assessed vendors on 18 key performance indicators, including customization, interfaces, reliability and deployment. Allscripts scored best in seven of the 18 indicators, displacing Epic Systems, which has held the top spot for the past three years. Cerner and McKesson also earned high scores.  

"Top scoring EHR vendors that are attracting the available market share are looking for patient engagement tools, clinical decision support, quality measurement solutions, mobile capabilities, intelligent interoperability and financial analytics as part of their EHR compendium," Doug Brown, managing partner of Black Book, said in a statement. "There are growth opportunities for vendors actually delivering those robust product strategies to the market."

Allscripts, new startups and cloud EHR vendors had the largest increase in client experience scores.

A third (32 percent) of respondents also reported that they were reevaluating their systems and current vendors; 19 percent of them said that the evaluation would "likely" lead to a replacement of their system. The study doesn't indicate whether that means the hospital would switch vendors.

The findings are somewhat similar to those found for small, rural and critical access hospitals. While CPSI took top honors for the fourth year in a row in that market, other top ranked vendors included Allscripts, Cerner, and Epic Systems, as well as GE Healthcare.  

To learn more:
- download the report summary  

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