8 vendors providers will turn to when replacing their EHR

Eight electronic health record vendors come out on top as the most likely users will turn to when replacing their systems, according to a new index published by Black Book Rankings.

The new report, "2013 State of Replacement EHR Market Study" is a follow up of an assessment of EHR users from earlier this year, which found that up to 17 percent of physician practices planned to switch EHR systems. Black Book developed the index to help replacement buyers compare outcomes and capabilities of different EHR vendor products.

Black Book found that eight vendors from a field of 550 qualified systems and nearly 900 EHR competitors scored consistently in the top one percent when it came to replacement market satisfaction:

  • Vitera
  • Practice Fusion
  • Care360 Quest
  • Cerner
  • Greenway
  • GE Healthcare
  • ChartLogic
  • athenacare

"Regularly, at least two of these eight vendors were on the short lists of 88 percent of the current replacement market buyers surveyed," Doug Brown, Managing Partner of Black Book, said in an announcement.

The results dovetail with a Black Book study published last week that found that most EHR vendors will likely be out of business by 2017.

The study also found that of the physician practices that had indicated planned to switch EHR systems, 81 percent were on track to replace their original EHR.

Providers have long been hampered by problems in using their EHR systems, causing frustration and slowing government efforts to transition the industry to such tools. A recent KLAS study found usability of EHRs varied significantly, but that Epic and athenahealth scored higher in usability than other systems.

To learn more:
- here's the announcement

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