New inspector general at Texas agency aims to alter fraud enforcement perceptions

Stuart Bowen inherited a difficult job when he was appointed inspector general of the Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC), but nine months later, he's making notable progress, according to the Austin American Statesman.

Following months of reports and investigations surrounding a $110 million no-bid contract with 21CT, and a backlog of 1,700 cases, the Texas HHSC looked beyond saving. But since he was appointed to lead the Medicaid fraud control unit in January, Bowen has made it a point to change the perception of the agency. Already he has helped negotiate 24 fraud settlements totaling $9 million in recoveries, implemented a new leadership team and created a new division to focus on inspections. He's also spent much of his time re-establishing relationships with Medicaid providers that were subjected to frequent investigations and suspended Medicaid payments by the previous administration. Article

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