Blowing the whistle on fraud may be hazardous to your career

For some whistleblowers, reporting misconduct in the workplace is worth the risk of termination or other kinds of retaliation. In addition to exposing wrongdoing, they may receive a portion of a large settlement; the Department of Justice reports that in fiscal year 2013 it paid out more than $345 million to the "courageous individuals" who exposed fraud and false claims by filing a qui tam complaint under the provisions of the False Claims Act. But that's only one part of the story, especially if the whistleblower works for a federal agency. In many cases, government employees who stick their necks out receive a traditional federal punishment: banishment to windowless offices, often in the basement, far away from coworkers and friends. Article

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