Consider tax, regulatory relief

Health insurance benefits form
Some lawmakers want to raise the employer mandate threshold so that businesses with fewer than 500 employees don't have to provide coverage to their employees. (Getty/michaelquirk)

Editor's note: This article is part of a multi-page special report, 8 Ways to Fix the Affordable Care Act

If lawmakers want to tweak the Affordable Care Act without kicking up too much controversy, they could consider targeting some of the law's wonkier provisions.

There's common ground to be found in several of the law’s taxes, which are unpopular with the healthcare industry and politicians. There are plenty of provisions that are easy to hate.

One low-hanging fruit: the medical device tax, which is largely reviled by device manufacturers and was set to be done away with in several iterations of Republicans’ Affordable Care Act repeal bills.

RELATED: Return of health insurance tax will hike premiums by 2.6% next year, report estimates

Insurance companies would be happy if lawmakers did away with the health insurance tax, which they say contributes to higher premiums. Even some conservative groups have recently begun to call for a repeal of this tax.

Employer groups, meanwhile, have called for a full repeal of the so-called Cadillac tax on high-cost health plans. That tax is so unpopular that it's never actually been implemented: It was delayed for 2 years as part of a 2016 spending bill that also delayed the health insurance tax and the medical device tax for a year.

Speaking of employer-sponsored coverage, some business groups would likely approve of an idea floated by the self-dubbed Problem Solvers Caucus composed of GOP and Democratic lawmakers.

RELATED: 'Problem Solvers Caucus' outlines bipartisan healthcare policy fixes in lieu of ACA repeal

The caucus wants to change the employer mandate so that only those with 500 employees or more—rather than 50 or more—are required to provide coverage to their employees. Proponents argue that would stimulate the economy: Small businesses accounted for 64% of the net new jobs created between 1993 and 2011, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

“The current employer mandate places a regulatory burden on smaller employers and acts as a disincentive for many small businesses to grow past 50 employees,” the caucus said in an announcement. 

Consider tax, regulatory relief