MGMA 2017: Traversing the 'brave new world' of practice transformation

care team
This year's MGMA conference includes a track that focuses on transforming practices.

Educational tracks at this year's MGMA conference at the Anaheim Conference Center in California focus on nine topics including efficiency, financial management, leadership growth, patient relationships, government affairs, staff engagement, the “pendulum” between integrated and independent practices and advocacy.

But the track focusing on transforming practices will likely draw attendees as it includes vital discussions on implementing alternative payment models, data analytics and forming strategic partnerships.

Michael-Cuff
Michael Cuffe

Here's a look at some of the key sessions in the "Practice Transformation—A Brave New World" track:

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Monday, Oct. 9, 2017

10:30 a.m. in Ballroom DE: At "The Evolution of Value-based Care and Risk-based Reimbursement Models from a Physician Practice Perspective," Michael Cuffe, M.D., CEO of physician services for Brentwood, Tennessee-based HCA Physician Services, will provide a physician practice perspective on the industry's transformation to value-based care and how new reimbursement models have evolved over time, as well as the impact these new models have on patient populations and management approaches.

Lori-Hulse
Lori Hulse

1 p.m. in Ballroom B: Transforming a practice into a patient-centered medical home takes time and investment.

For groups interested in undertaking the challenge, the Lehigh Valley Physician Group will share more on its experiences at the “10 PCMH Lessons Learned” session.

Jonathan Davidson, the Allentown, Pennsylvania-based group’s senior project manager, and Lori Hulse, its vice president for operations, will describe both failures and successes that LVPG encountered while it became a PCMH, and they’ll show how those lessons can be applied at other physician practices.

Tuesday, Oct. 10, 2017

Matt-Hayes
Matthew Hayes

8:15 a.m. in Ballroom B: Want to better support clinical teams as they navigate EHRs and quality reporting metrics? Then check out "Quality Driven Support Systems for Providers" with Matthew Hayes, operational project manager at the University of North Carolina, and Megan Romeo Foster, training manager for UNC Healthcare.

The session will focus on a case study that illustrates the value of real-time, customized provider support systems. Hayes and Romeo will provide strategies for implementing a similar program in a practice or physician group that has limited resources.

Dan-Mingle
Dan Mingle

1 p.m. in Ballroom B: As providers strive for improved quality and safety in patient care, they may forget about healthcare's "fourth aim": improving the work-life balance for healthcare workers.

At "Secrets of the Highly Functional Practice," Daniel Mingle, M.D., CEO of Mingle Analytics, will offer practical changes that can improve job satisfaction.

But the session doesn't focus solely on improving the experience for staff members, as Mingle will also share strategies to improve the patient experience and workflow as he dives into three practice design models that have paid dividends.

For more information on the practice transformation track and other educational sessions, view the MGMA conference brochure (PDF).

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