WellPoint (NYSE: WLP) Earnings Q1 2011




View WellPoint's (NYSE: WLP) Q1 Earnings Report


Highlights:

  • First quarter net income rose nearly six percent, to $927 million, totaling $2.44 per share. First-quarter profit increased two percent, to $891 million (to $2.35 per share) 
  • Q1 operational exenses decreased two percent, to $13.4 billion
  • Q1 revenue fell one percent, to nearly $15 billion - lower premiums contributed to this decrease
  • Medical membership increased 363,00 (one percent) during the twelve months ended March 31, 2011. The gains were offset, hoewver, by declines in Individual and Local Group businesses
  • Selling, general and administrative expense decreased by $98 million, or 4.5 percent, from Q1 2010
  • WellPoint's benefit expense ratio was 82.1 percent in the first quarter of 2011, up 30 basis points from last year's first quarter
  • The company expects full-year 2011 net income is expected to be at least $6.70 per share, including net investment gains of $0.10 per share

Notable quote: "Operating gain decreased $120.2, or 37%, to $205.8 in 2011, primarily due to lower operating gains in our Senior and State-Sponsored businesses. Our Senior business declined as a result of higher medical costs in 2011, including the impact of a more normalized flu season. Our State-Sponsored operating gain was lower in 2011 as 2010 benefited from retroactive premium for certain programs. In addition, operating gain in our Individual business declined as we complied with the minimum medical loss ratio requirements."

For more information:
- Read the company's 10-Q report filed with the SEC
- Check out WellPoint's current earnings estimates from CNN Money
- Read this press release
- See how WLP is performing right now
- WellPoint's website: www.wellpoint.com

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