WellPoint hires former Coca-Cola exec as CIO; CA to mail voter registration cards to exchange enrollees;

News From Around the Web:

> WellPoint names a former Coca-Cola executive as its new chief information officer. Thomas Miller served as CIO for Coca-Cola, where he worked since 1982, reported Insurance & Technology. Article

> California is going to mail voter registration cards to the almost 3.8 million residents who applied for a health plan sold on the state-based health insurance exchange, the Los Angeles Times reported. Article

> Kansas House lawmakers have passed a bill that would have the state join a healthcare compact in which several states set up their own health insurance regulations separate from the Affordable Care Act, reported the Kansas City Star. Congress would have to approve the bill if it's ultimately signed into law. Article

Health Provider News:

> Massachusetts nurses and hospital executives are at odds over legislation that requires lower nurse-patient ratios. Article

> Hospitals are challenged during this turbulent time of consolidations, higher than ever CEO turnover, proposed limits on executive pay and declining Medicare reimbursements when negotiating CEO compensation. Article

Health IT News:

> Continuous, contact-free electronic monitoring of hospital patients helped to reduce length of stay by roughly 9 percent, according to research published in the American Journal of Medicine. Article

> Ongoing performance improvement should be the primary goal of technology use in healthcare, says a Kaiser Permanente executive. Article

And Finally... If you're in a disagreement with someone, just call the witchdoctor. Article

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