Sebelius says U.S. healthcare is stuck in 20th century; Hillary Clinton says technology will move reform forward;

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> The U.S. healthcare delivery system is stuck in "the 20th century," falling behind medical and technological advances, U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius said Thursday at The Aspen Institute and The Advisory Board Company's Care Innovation Summit in Washington, D.C., The Hill's Healthwatch reported. Article

> About 15 percent of seniors said they "benefited from" the Affordable Care Act, while 49 percent said it had "no impact" on them and 27 percent said they have been "negatively impacted" by the law,  according to a national survey of  voters ages 65 and older by The Tarrance Group. Survey

> Regence Health Insurance Services has launched a new private exchange for mid- and large-sized businesses in Idaho, Oregon, Utah and Washington, the insurance company said yesterday. Announcement

Health IT News

> Debates in Washington, D.C., may sometimes feel like they take place in an "evidence-free zone," but healthcare information technology provides the evidence needed to achieve better healthcare for all, Hillary Clinton said Wednesday during a keynote address at the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society's annual conference in Orlando, Fla. Article

> Meaningful Use Stage 2 will go on as planned with no further extensions, but Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Administrator Marilyn Tavenner announced that the agency would be more flexible about providing hardship exemptions for providers and vendors truly struggling to meet the incentive program's requirements. Article

And Finally... The case of the disappearing reporter. Video

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