Report: More young adults gained health coverage

The number of young adults without health insurance coverage fell between 2010 and 2011, the first such decline since 1997, according to a new report.

The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities report found that the number of uninsured among people ages 19 to 25 dropped to 27.9 percent in 2011 from 33.9 percent the year before. The report was based on a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention survey, reported the Huffington Post.

Although the report didn't officially conclude that the drop in uninsured was a result of the reform law's provision allowing children to remain on their parents' insurance policies until they're 26 years old, the study's author said it was almost certainly the cause, The New York Times reported.

The Center also found that the uninsured rate actually increased among adults aged 26 to 35 years old, further indicating that the reform law is driving the drop among young adults, according to the International Business Times.

The extension of coverage to young adults remains one of the reform law's most well-liked requirements. Because of its popularity, several of the big insurers, including UnitedHealth, Aetna and Humana, pledged to continue covering young adults through their parents' health plans even if the Supreme Court ruled the whole law unconstitutional, FierceHealthPayer previously reported.

To learn more:
- read the New York Times article
- check out the Huffington Post article
- see the International Business Times article

Suggested Articles

A New Jersey medical office has filed suit against Cigna, alleging that the insurer failed to pay for diagnostic testing and treatment for COVID-19.

CMS issued new guidance Friday to help states implement the new interoperability policies in Medicaid and CHIP programs.

GoodRx has released its latest list of the most expensive drugs in America, with orphan drugs and therapies for rare conditions topping the ranking.