Maternity coverage required in Colorado; UnitedHealth buys Inspiris;

> Individual major medical insurance policies renewed in Colorado since Jan. 1 must be changed to include maternity coverage, reports the Denver Business Journal. The state department of insurance already has approved rate increases for some insurers, based on its approval of rates for similar new policies. For those that haven't submitted rate increases, the DOI will quickly review allowable rates. Article

> The National Association of Insurance Commissioners is getting a final copy of a health insurance and medical term glossary that was developed to implement the health reform law, according to National Underwriter. For example, in the glossary, the NAIC defines "allowed amount" as, "Maximum amount on which payment is based for covered health care services. This may be called 'eligible expense,' 'payment allowance' or 'negotiated rate.' If your provider charges more than the allowed amount, you may have to pay the difference." Article

> Aetna is partnering with Carilion Clinic in Virginia to develop new insurance plans aimed at rewarding providers for producing better patient health outcomes while lowering costs, reports the Roanoke Times. The two organizations intend to develop several new insurance offerings including three co-branded commercial insurance plans and a managed care plan for Medicaid recipients. Additionally, Aetna will take over as the administrator of Carilion's own benefits plan for its employees and will administer Carilion's Medicare Advantage insurance plans. Article

> UnitedHealth Group purchased Inspiris, which partners with individual health plans to provide care for Medicare Advantage health plan members. OptumHealth, a subsidiary of UnitedHealth Group, bought Inspiris for an undisclosed sum on March 10, reports the Nashville Business Journal. "There'll be no real changes in terms of management," said OptumHealth spokesman Chuck Grothaus. Article

And Finally... He's one lucky goose. Article

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