Lawsuit challenging AZ's Medicaid expansion dismissed; NY's exchange enrolls 400,000;

News From Around the Web

> A lawsuit challenging Medicaid expansion in Arizona has been dismissed, so Gov. Jan Brewer can continue her plan to expand the program despite fellow Republicans' opposition, the Associated Press reported. Article

> New York's health insurance exchange has enrolled more than 400,000 consumers since October, including more than 251,000 consumers who chose private plans and 160,000 people who qualified for Medicaid. Almost 700,000 consumers have completed applications but haven't yet enrolled in a plan, The Hill's Healthwatch reported. Article

> New Hampshire state lawmakers have reached a deal to expand Medicaid using the private option to allow about 50,000 consumers to buy private coverage through federal funds, reported the New York Times. Article

Health Provider News

> Some companies are partnering with healthcare providers who will accept fixed fees or bundled payments instead of traditional fees for services rendered. Article

> In states that have declined to expand Medicaid, cuts to disproportionate share hospital payments will go through without additional reimbursements to balance them out. Article

Health IT News

> Medical identity theft in the U.S. has risen swiftly in recent years--especially theft involving a breach in technology. The rising numbers have left many concerned about the effectiveness of privacy regulations. Article

> Medical devices now will be subject to scrutiny from the Office of the Inspector General, according to OIG's 2014 work plan. Article

And finally... What's for dinner ... 25-year old fish? Article

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