Insurers change prescriptions for cheaper drugs; HMOs have highest premium increases;

> Health insurers change up to 70 percent of prescription medications, according to a new survey. It is not a simple case of switching a brand-name drug for a generic one, but rather the change is motivated by finding a cheaper drug, notes The Street. Article

> HMO plans will have the highest premium increases in five years largely because HMOs' ample benefits are attractive to people who use costly medical services, reports the Los Angeles Times. The Southeast is expected to see the biggest hikes next year (12.5 percent), while the West is expected to have the smallest (9 percent). Article

> An online program offers a return on investment and enhances a patient's ability to self manage chronic health conditions. Outcomes from a recent study showed that 93 percent of Highmark members were better able to manage their conditions. Healthcare costs per person per year were $757 less than predicted for participants relative to the matched nonparticipants, according to Highmark. Press release

And finally ... Even the paralyzed can walk. Article

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