Humana buys Concentra; NAIC approves preexisting conditions;

> Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan is facing a wave of lawsuits across the state for allegedly pocketing millions of dollars in hidden fees from local governments and others to administer their healthcare plans, reports the Detroit Free Press. Article

> Humana announced it will buy Concentra Inc., a privately held healthcare company, for $790 million cash. The move gives Humana more than 300 medical centers in 42 states where Concentra delivers occupational medicine, urgent care, physical therapy and wellness services to workers, reports FierceHealthcare. Article

> A task force of the National Association of Insurance Commissioners has advanced model language on the new ban on health insurance preexisting condition exclusions for children and young adults up to age 19. The draft would let states permit sellers of individual health insurance to discourage adverse selection by using open enrollment periods during which children could be enrolled on a guaranteed-issue basis, notes the National Underwriter. Article

> Blue Cross Blue Shield of Louisiana and East Jefferson General Hospital have ended a months-long standoff with a new contract that immediately returns the medical center to the preferred provider network of the state's largest health insurer, reports the Times-Picayune. The parties are not disclosing the specific terms of their agreement, but said it is a three-year deal and is in line with the typical range for contracts between an insurer and a large community hospital. Article

> WellPoint has been recognized as a top employer by three prominent national publications. Press Release

And finally … Don't stand near a smoker--it may kill you. Article

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