Humana aims to manage members' chronic disease

Humana (NYSE: HUM) is rolling out a new complex care management division aimed at improving the quality of life for its members with chronic disease.

Humana Cares Chronic Condition Management will launch in January 2011 and serve 60,000 commercial health plan and Medicare Advantage members suffering from chronic conditions, including congestive heart failure, obstructive pulmonary disease, coronary artery disease and complex diabetes, according to Business First. "At Humana Cares, we don't manage a disease; we work side by side to help our members manage their health and improve their quality of life," said Humana Cares President Jean Bisio.

Humana Cares' holistic approach aims to help those who live with chronic medical conditions, focusing on the whole person, not just a single disease. More than 50,000 members of the existing care management program already have experienced a 36 percent decline in hospital admissions and a 22 percent drop in emergency room visits, the company said. Some 270 associates will be hired in the St. Petersburg, Fla. area before the Jan. 2011 launch to staff the chronic condition management program.

Humana Cares teams work together to:

  • help members remain independent and safe in their homes;
  • create one-step care for both medical and quality-of-life needs, such as making sure members have safety items installed in their homes and ensuring their transportation and prescription needs are met;
  • provide education on self-care management, including preventive measures like teaching a diabetic to monitor and record daily blood sugar levels;
  • place a variety of remote biometric monitoring devices in the member's home and identify and treat events before they lead to emergency or inpatient admissions;
  • assist members in navigating through a complicated health care system; and
  • put members in touch with community resources.

To learn more:
- read Humana's press release
- read the Business First article

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