Horizon pays for full-time care coordinator; West Virginia may prohibit abortions from plans;

> Health payers in West Virginia would be prohibited from covering abortions deemed "elective" under a proposed state bill, reports the Charleston Gazette. The legislation would instead require women to seek supplemental policies and pay separate premiums for such coverage. The measure extends to group and individual plans as well as to regular policies sold through the future insurance exchange. Article

> Maine's Bureau of Insurance will hold public comment sessions next month on a proposed premium increase for Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield's individual policyholders. Anthem submitted a filing last week proposing an average 9.7 percent increase in premiums for the more than 11,000 policyholders, reports the Morning Sentinel. Article

> Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey is paying for staff to work full time at medical offices participating in a patient-centered medical home pilot program, according to American Medical News. The population care coordinator will offer what Horizon called "clinical and administrative support," helping document care as required to earn quality-based pay and contacting patients about care. Article

> Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan is launching an initiative with 22 hospital trauma centers and the American College of Surgeons to improve quality and safety of care provided in trauma units across the state. The Michigan Trauma Quality Improvement Program will develop a system for trauma centers to measure and improve patient outcomes, identify best practices and share data to better trauma quality and safety of care patients receive. Article

And Finally... All you need is windshield wiper fluid for survival. Article

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