Highmark buys provider group, invests $20M to upgrade failing hospital

Highmark is investing $20 million to upgrade a Pittsburgh-area hospital, the insurer announced Wednesday.

Forbes Regional Hospital in Monroeville is getting a facelift, including new signage to improve its visibility in the community, and clinical upgrades, such as a new breast care center and improved nursing units, reports the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Highmark also plans to update the 30-year-old hospital's medical and surgical units and add a third operating room for heart procedures.

Meanwhile, the insurer said it is affiliating with Monroeville-based Premier Medical Associates, which is the biggest independent provider practice in western Pennsylvania, according to the Pittsburgh Business Times. "Premier and Highmark share the same values about putting patients first and ensuring that they are at the center of everything we do," Highmark President and CEO Ken Melani said.

Highmark's provider organization, a separate company from its insurance business, will own Premier Medical Associates, which employs 250 people in 10 offices. Of the 60 doctors working with Premier, about 12 also work at Forbes Hospital, according to the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review.

To learn more:
- read the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review article
- see the Pittsburgh Business Times article
- check out the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette article

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