Fallon Health Plan suspends directors' payments; Humana monitors patients online;

> Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan has created a new insurance plan for young adults between 19 to 30 that costs less than $100 a month for medical coverage, plus preventive dental and vision coverage, according to the Detroit News. Pricing starts at $93.27 a month, with a $1,000 deductible and a maximum annual out-of-pocket payment by customers of $3,500. Article

> The Connecticut Insurance Department has made it easier for consumers to search for health insurance rate filings and to understand them, reports the Hartford Courant. Its website also provides a new summary for each filing, including the policy type, number of affected policyholders, request date, the department's determination for rejecting or approving the request, dates that new rates take effect, and the insurer's reasons for proposing higher premiums. Article

> A Humana pilot project allows nurses to manage the care of patients with congestive heart failure anywhere in the country by using the Intel Health Guide, a computer in a patient's home that provides daily monitoring of vital signs and transmits that information online, reports the Tampa Bay Business Journal. The pilot project, which rolls out over the next 18 months to 2,000 Humana members, aims to help prevent more costly healthcare events, such as visits to the emergency room or hospitalizations. Article

> Fallon Community Health Plan became the second nonprofit Massachusetts health insurer to stop five-figure payments to directors for their part-time service, according to the Boston Globe. Fallon's move is likely to step up the pressure on two larger nonprofit rivals, Harvard Pilgrim Health Care and Tufts Health Plan, to halt their own directors' compensation. Both have said their boards will consider the matter later this month. Article

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