CIGNA will pay Employees to Volunteer

Encourages Employees to Give a Day of Service

  • As of July 1, 2010, CIGNA will offer all employees up to eight hours of paid time off for volunteer activities per year
  • Potential of over 200,000 hours of service in local communities across the country
  • Estimated dollar value of donated time is approximately $4 million*

PHILADELPHIA--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- CIGNA announced today a new program that will extend the company’s ability to help those in need, improve local communities and provide meaningful volunteer opportunities to its employees across the country. Effective July 1, 2010, the company’s 26,000 employees will be given eight hours of paid time off each year to volunteer with various not-for-profit health and community service organizations to make a collective difference in communities throughout the U. S. through more than 200,000 hours of donated time.

“Every day, in communities across the country, on the job and on their own, the people of CIGNA are helping others to lead healthier, more productive and secure lives,” said David Cordani, president and CEO of CIGNA. “Through this new program, we are strengthening our culture of service, transforming lives and helping shape a healthier America.”

By offering employees paid time to volunteer in communities where they live and work, CIGNA not only has a direct impact on the health, well-being and sense of security of a community, but invests in its own employees at the same time. Studies show people who regularly volunteer report better overall health and volunteerism can provide essential training and diversification that can lead to improved job performance and satisfaction.

Cordani said that the company’s plan to strengthen employee volunteerism is all the more important in these challenging economic times. “Expanding the volunteer pool in our communities touches every-one and helps CIGNA employees make a difference every day both on and off the job,” Cordani said.

The new service program builds upon CIGNA’s existing volunteer programs, such as the CIGNA Foundation’s Community Caring Awards, which honor the important work its employees are doing with their neighbors outside of working hours through grants to not-for-profit organizations.

About CIGNA

CIGNA (NYSE:CI), a global health service company, is dedicated to helping people improve their health, well being and sense of security. CIGNA Corporation's operating subsidiaries provide an integrated suite of medical, dental, behavioral health, pharmacy and vision care benefits, as well as group life, accident and disability insurance, to approximately 46 million people throughout the United States and around the world. To learn more about CIGNA, visit www.cigna.com. To sign up for email alerts or an RSS feed of company news, log on to http://newsroom.cigna.com/rss/. Also, follow us on Twitter: @cigna and visit CIGNA’s YouTube channel at http://www.youtube.com/cignatv

CIGNA Foundation is a private foundation funded by contributions from CIGNA Corporation and its subsidiaries. The CIGNA Foundation supports organizations sharing its commitment to enhancing the health of individuals and families, and the well-being of their communities, with a special focus on those communities where CIGNA employees live and work.

* Independent Sector, a nonprofit, nonpartisan coalition of charities, foundations, and corporate philanthropy programs, estimates the dollar value of volunteer time is $20.85 per hour (2009).



CONTACT:

CIGNA
Kathleen Keenan, 215-761-4756
[email protected]

KEYWORDS:   United States  North America  Pennsylvania

INDUSTRY KEYWORDS:   Health  Philanthropy  Professional Services  Human Resources  Insurance  Other Philanthropy  Managed Care

MEDIA:

Logo
 Logo

Suggested Articles

In a letter, 111 physician organizations weighed in on surprise billing, urging Congress not to turn more power over to health insurers.

Even when taking into account increased resources, general and vascular procedures performed in teaching hospitals are better for high-risk patients.

As members of Congress wrangle over the best way to stop surprise medical bills, one senator predicts Washington will pass a new law soon.