Cigna, Humana to waive cost-sharing for COVID-19 treatment

coronavirus nih
Cigna and Humana are waiving cost-sharing for treatment related to COVID-19. (NIH)

Two more national insurers are waiving member cost-sharing for inpatient treatment related to COVID-19. 

Cigna and Humana announced Monday that they would waive copayments and other cost-sharing for members treated for the novel coronavirus, building on previously announced waivers for the cost associated with telehealth and testing. 

Cigna will cover these costs in its group health plans, Medicare Advantage, individual market through May 31, while Humana’s waiver, which applies to its MA, Medicaid and fully-insured commercial plans, has no end date at present, the insurers said. 

“We’re uniquely positioned to help our members during this unprecedented health crisis,” said Humana CEO Bruce Broussard in a statement. “It’s why we’re taking this significant action to help ease the burden on seniors and others who are struggling right now. No American should be concerned about the cost of care when being treated for coronavirus.” 

RELATED: Payers’ response to COVID-19 evolves as pandemic continues to spread 

Cigna said it would also be working with self-insured employer clients to offer the waivers, though these companies would be able to opt-out. 

CVS Health’s Aetna also announced last week that it would waive costs for inpatient treatment for its commercial plans. Payers’ responses to the pandemic have evolved over the past several weeks, as they agree to waive additional services and step in to assist slammed providers in managing patient needs. 

Cigna also announced that it would be deploying hundreds of its staff clinicians—including doctors and nurse practitioners—to join the staff at MDLIVE, Cigna’s telehealth partner, to increase capacity and meet the demand for visits. 

Cigna clinicians are also staffing a behavioral health hotline and continuing to provide regular care, the insurer said. 

“Our customers with COVID-19 should focus on fighting this virus and preventing its spread,” Cigna CEO David Cordani said in a statement. “While our customers focus on regaining their health, we have their backs.” 

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