Californians support reform law, but know little about exchange

A new series of polls demonstrate the mindset of California consumers when it comes to the reform law. Among the many findings, a majority of Californians still don't understand or lack general knowledge about healthcare reform, despite the law's continued popularity throughout the state.

According to Field Polls released last week, only 25 percent of California voters younger than 65 years old said they've heard about the state's health insurance exchange, Covered California. Among uninsured voters, only 18 percent knew much about the online marketplace, reported the Los Angeles Times.

"When you're talking about a complicated piece of public policy, it's very difficult to get your hands around it," Field Poll Director Mark DiCamillo told the San Francisco Chronicle. "That's asking a lot of people."

Meanwhile, 50 percent of survey respondents said their health costs are "very" or "somewhat difficult" to afford, and another 50 percent said their health costs increased from last year.

The good news is the survey respondents showed they're willing to learn more about the exchange. About 65 percent of voters under 65 said they're interested in finding out more information about Covered California and the plans sold through the marketplace. And 83 percent of uninsured said they were interested.

The survey also found Californians largely support the reform law with 63 percent of respondents under 30 supporting it and 47 percent of those 65 and older supporting it. "This law is just highly charged politically," DiCamillo told the Sacramento Bee. "People have their opinions on it and are pretty stable. They haven't changed over time."

To learn more:
- access the Field Polls here
- read the Los Angeles Times article
- see the San Francisco Chronicle article
- check out the Sacramento Bee article

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