California Physician Groups Opposed to Rate Regulation Initiative

LOS ANGELES--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- California Association of Physician Groups:

Statement from Donald Crane

President and CEO

California Association of Physician Groups

 

“The California Association of Physician Groups and the nearly 60,000 physicians we represent cannot support the rate regulation initiative. While CAPG and its members are concerned about rising healthcare costs, this ballot initiative does not address cost factors such as healthcare workforce, pharmaceuticals, technology, or issues surrounding an aging population or the surge in obesity or other chronic diseases.

Arbitrarily imposing rate regulations will have the unintended consequence of seriously undermining our ability to provide coordinated, accountable and affordable care to patients.”

About CAPG

The California Association of Physician Groups (CAPG) represents 150 groups that employ or contract with nearly 60,000 California doctors and provide care to 18 million Californians. CAPG is committed to improving healthcare for Californians and supports a progressive and organized system of healthcare delivery, which focuses on coordinated treatment plans and comprehensive coverage, including the most current preventive services and exams. This allows physicians to focus on illness prevention and proactive management of patients in order to maintain their optimum level of health. www.capg.org.



CONTACT:

For CAPG
Kris Deutschman, 916-444-8801 (o)
916-425-7174 (m)
[email protected]

KEYWORDS:   United States  North America  California

INDUSTRY KEYWORDS:   Health  Hospitals  Public Policy/Government  Public Policy  State/Local  Nursing  Managed Care

MEDIA:

Logo
 Logo

Suggested Articles

The Pew Charitable Trusts is calling for federal policymakers to move forward with data-sharing regulations in the midst of the COVID-19 outbreak.

Humana is launching new initiatives aimed at easing the administrative burden on providers as they treat patients with COVID-19. 

Physician practices across the country worry if they can survive the cash crunch caused by the coronavirus pandemic.