Aetna provides grants for coordinated care studies; S.C. Blues has $4.8B economic impact;

> Aetna has awarded $750,000 in grants to three medical centers--Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City, the National Assembly on School-Based Health Care in Washington, D.C., and Community Health Center, Inc., in Middletown, Conn.--to determine how best to coordinate treatment and reduce hospital readmissions, reported the Hartford Business Journal. "The more precisely we can envision what coordinated care looks like and how best to weave it into the everyday delivery of health care, the closer we can get to an optimal delivery of care that produces the best outcomes at the lowest cost," said Gillian Barclay, vice president of the Aetna Foundation. Article

> Blue Cross Blue Shield of South Carolina has a $4.8 billion yearly impact on the state's economy, according to a study by the University of South Carolina's Moore School of Business. As one of the largest employers in South Carolina, the Blues plan has a direct impact, as well as a ripple effect, on the economy as its employees spend money throughout the community, reported the Myrtle Beach Sun News. Article

> Consumer advocacy groups, including AARP, the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network, Families USA and Planned Parenthood, are urging the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services not to delay the summary of benefits rule, according to The Hill's Healthwatch. In a letter to HHS, the groups said a delay would prevent consumers from making informed choices. Article

> And Finally... Considering another cup of coffee? Check your iPhone first. Article

Suggested Articles

Microsoft is warning hospitals that sophisticated ransomware attacks are trying to exploit remote workers to gain access to their networks.

Report: Medicaid expansion critical amid COVID-19 job losses

As more Americans lose their jobs amid the COVID-19 pandemic, the number of people without health insurance is also expected to rise. 

There could be imminent shortages of antimalarial drugs and antibiotics that are critical to providing care for COVID-19 patients.