West Wireless gets additional $25M, partners with Mexico's Slim, welcomes Chopra

The West Wireless Healthcare Institute got a triple-barreled injection of momentum last week, including its first international partnership.

The Gary and Mary West Foundation on Thursday pledged another $25 million, bringing the West family's total commitment to the La Jolla, Calif.-based institute that bears the Wests' names to $90 million. The new funding will help accelerate recruitment of engineers and ramp up innovation and research worldwide, according to the institute.

On the same day, West Wireless announced a partnership with the Mexico City-based Carlos Slim Health Institute to advance wireless healthcare technologies in the U.S., Mexico and elsewhere in Latin America. That organization was founded by the world's richest man, Mexican telecom mogul Carlos Slim Helú. "It is exciting to collaborate with the West Wireless Health Institute as they exemplify the same focus, values and commitment to help bring low-cost, innovative healthcare solutions to people around the world as the Carlos Slim Health Institute," Dr. Roberto Tapia, president and CEO of the Slim Institute, says in a press release.

Friday, West Wireless got a visit from federal CTO Aneesh Chopra (pictured far right), who toured the facility and met with institute leadership. Text of his Chopra's remarks weren't readily available, but West Wireless CEO Don Casey released this statement: "Chopra has been outspoken on the need for public-private collaboration to spur health care innovation, and the institute shares his passion and commitment to unlocking opportunities for Americans to take this lead."

To learn more:
- see this West Wireless press release on the latest pledge from the West Foundation
- here's the West Wireless announcement of the partnership with Slim's organization (.pdf)
- read this Xconomy San Diego story

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