Study: iPhone app is solid for stroke imaging

A new iPhone app works just as well as a computer workstation for physicians' making remote diagnoses or treatment decisions according to a study conducted by the University of Calgary and published in the May 6 Journal of Medical Internet Research.

Researchers studied 120 noncontrast computed tomography (NCCT) and 70 computed tomography angiogram (CTA) head scans using Calgary Scientific's ResolutionMD Mobile app. They found the level of resolution, and ability to identify small details in the image, was the same for the iPhone app as it was for a computer workstation.

One of the major pluses of the app is its client-server setup, which allows the images to be loaded rapidly, but not stored on the iPhone itself, researchers report. Instead, the server loads and "renders" the patient images, transmitting that rendered frame to the phone, the explain.

"We were pleasantly surprised at our ability to detect subtle findings on the CT scan, which are often very critical in patient management, using this software," says Mayank Goyal, one of the neuro-radiologists who analyzed the data. "Another strength of this platform was its ability to handle massive imaging datasets of over 700 images seamlessly over the iPhone."

To learn more:
- see the announcement
- here's the Journal of Medical Internet Research article

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