Sotera gets $11M investment, while AllOne Mobile may be gone

This week brings news of one m-health company on the rise and one apparently on the way out.

Sotera Wireless, a San Diego-based maker of patient monitoring technology, has landed a third series of venture financing. This round, a $10.75 million capital investment, is led by West Family Holdings, headed by billionaire Gary West. That's the same Gary West, who, along with his wife, Mary, created the West Wireless Healthcare Institute with a $45 million commitment last year. Other Sotera investors include Sanderling Ventures, Qualcomm Ventures and Intel Capital.

Sotera will put the money toward commercializing a vitals monitoring platform called ViSi Mobile, according to the company. "Sotera's novel technology for monitoring all of the vital signs will be a valuable safety net for seniors and people suffering from chronic diseases who want to live independently, but be connected to their doctor if there is a problem," West says in a press release.

Meanwhile, it seems as if one-time rising star AllOne Mobile is dead. AllOne Mobile, a subsidiary of Wilkes-Barre, Pa.-based AllOne Health, that ran a text-messaging pilot for the Military Health System's Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center last year, may have ceased operations. AllOne Mobile's home page says, "This site is currently unavailable. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause," and lists no further details or contact information.

Additionally, Frank Avignone, formerly the head of business & sales development for AllOne Mobile, now is listed as an independent healthcare consultant on his LinkedIn page.

For more:
- read this Sotera Wireless press release
- see this Telecare Aware blog post about AllOne Mobile

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