Sensor-based skin patch may bode new care level in diabetes treatment

A new skin patch featuring a biosensor and communications system that works off a smartphone may one day help diabetics better manage their condition while providing real-time monitoring of glucose measurements.

The patch, which developers say will be low-cost, disposable and painless to use, may also help in treating obesity by tracking users' movements. The Mayo Clinic and biosensor maker Gentag are developing the patch, according to a report at MedCity News.

The joint effort also will focus on developing a communication chip that ties together Mayo's Micro-Miniature Transceiver chips with Gentag's radar responsive tag. "The communication chip will enable low power Body Area Networks that can read through tissue, geolocation and long-range communication," Gentag CEO and Founder John Peeters told MedCity News.

Regarding potential regulatory approval, Peeters told the news site it's unknown how long the oversight and review process will take. However, he said he's confident sensors for diabetes treatment technology will receive U.S. Food and Drug Administration clearance. Article

Suggested Articles

The newly launched Center for Connected Health will be largest telehealth hub in the Philadelphia region, according to Penn Medicine.

The FDA commissioner wants to use additional funding under Trump's budget to advance digital health initiatives and integrate real-world data.

The FDA's approval of an app that uses AI to notify specialists of a potential stroke offers new possibilities for triage software that uses CDS.