Researchers develop iPhone ear infection detection system; Sense4Baby to be first company in West Health Incubator;

> With Apple shunning Google Maps in favor of its own mapping software for iOS 6, iPhone and iPad users increasingly find themselves lost, Healthcare IT News reported. In several reported instances, Apple's map sent users searching for care to closed or non-existent healthcare facilities. The only time a user was sent to a hospital? When the individual was looking for a bar. Article

> Researchers at Georgia Tech and Emory University are working to develop technology that allows parents to diagnose ear infections using their iPhones. The technology, Remotoscope, is an attachment that clips on to the iPhone and comes with a software application. The attachment uses the iPhone's camera and flash as a light source, while the app records data to the phone. Images and video then can be sent to a doctor's inbox or a patient's electronic medical record. Announcement

> The West Health Institute announced last week that Sense4Baby, Inc., is licensing its Sense4Baby technology for a wireless fetal monitor. Sense4Baby also announced that it will be the first company in the West Health Incubator after receiving funding from the West Health Investment Fund. Announcement

And Finally… Why wasn't the squirrel just let go? Article

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