Mobile-phone enabled programs help young depression patients; Shoe monitor aims to reduce need for diabetic-related amputations;

> Mobile-phone enabled self-monitoring programs for adolescent patients suffering from depression are a good first step helping such patients increase their emotional self-awareness, according to a study published this week in the Journal of Medical Internet Research. The study, conducted by Australian researchers, determined that mobile phones were "ideally suited" for such care, as they made tracking daily experiences easy. Study

> Canadian-based medical technology company Orpyx expects to unveil a new tool later this year aimed at helping diabetic patients monitor physical activity levels of their feet to lower their risk of developing ulcers and infections that lead to amputation. The product--SurroSense Rx--is a shoe insert consisting of pressure sensors that alerts a patient's smartphone when too much pressure is being put on their heels, Medgadget reports. Post

> In an attempt to reduce hospital readmissions and pharmacy costs for senior citizens, residents at the nation's largest over-55 residential community soon will have access to telehealth services under an agreement with USF Health at the University of South Florida and American Well. This is the first venture in which Boston-based American Well has targeted a senior population with its Online Care telehealth solution. FierceHealthIT

And Finally… I wonder if he got the insurance. Article

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