KS clinic gets mobile VPN

A mobile virtual private network helps physicians, nurses and other staff at Wichita Clinic stay connected to the organizations servers even when they temporarily move out of Wi-Fi or even cellular coverage range. NetMotion Wireless, a Seattle-based VPN software developer, announced Tuesday that it has deployed its Mobility XE at the largest multispecialty practice in Kansas to provide centralized management of mobile devices and effectively seamless coverage for users. When a user goes out of range, the system sends a message to whatever application the user is logged into to make sure the person doesn't have to log back in when coverage resumes.

"There is a coverage cap, but it doesn't drop the session," NetMotionSenior Marketing Manager Amy Ting told FierceMobileHealthcare at the Healthcare Unbound conference last week in NetMotion's hometown. Ting says this technology is particularly useful for another client, the Visiting Nurse Service of New York, where nurses often travel to and from clients in that vast underground dead zone known as the New York City subway.

Network administrators can set all sorts of security and usage protocols. "If a device is lost or stolen, you can quarantine the device to protect mobile data," Ting explained. Managers also can prioritize applications on the network so, for example, Web surfers don't hog bandwidth needed for mobile X-ray units.

For more on the Wichita Clinic implementation and the mobile VPN technology:
- read the NetMotion press release

Suggested Articles

The newly launched Center for Connected Health will be largest telehealth hub in the Philadelphia region, according to Penn Medicine.

The FDA commissioner wants to use additional funding under Trump's budget to advance digital health initiatives and integrate real-world data.

The FDA's approval of an app that uses AI to notify specialists of a potential stroke offers new possibilities for triage software that uses CDS.