iPhone or Android: How to help your docs choose a smartphone

Whether you're buying mobile devices for your physicians, or you've chosen a device-agnostic philosophy for your mobile strategy, there's some interesting new guidance to help you (or your docs) choose which device to invest in.

Physician social network Doximity weighed in last week with some terrific, device-specific advice. Blogger Nate Gross reviewed everything from app quality to which telecom carriers provide the best service. Here are some of the highlights:

iPhones, iPads

Pros: Apple is the dominant device at the moment, and has more applications overall. It also has easier sync capability between iOS devices, faster deployment of medical apps, and the best video conferencing capability. Cons: The touch keypad can be tough to manage, and the devices are only available through Verizon and AT&T at the moment.

Android

Pros: Droid is the fastest-growing vendor in the smartphone market. Its processes are more powerful, its screens are larger, and its new features tend to be deployed faster. Android also is available through a variety of carriers, not just AT&T and Verizon. Cons: Android's app market is still smaller than Apple's, and has a "great deal of variation among phones," meaning that not all apps will work the same way on different devices. Android also doesn't play well with others, and is particularly difficult to sync with iPads and other tablet brands, Gross says.

Carrier issues

Gross praises Verizon as the top provider for true 4G capability, although he notes that most carriers are offering some 4G coverage. Verizon also tops Doximity's list for reception and data transmission reliability in large metro areas, although AT&T provides better coverage in rural areas.

Hospitals, though, will need to do extensive testing to determine true coverage limitations, Gross says. You need to check reception and transmission capabilities throughout the hospital, including tough-to-penetrate areas like radiology.

To learn more:
- check out Gross's review

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