Dell steps into mHealth with Meditech

Making a decisive move into the mobile environment, hardware behemoth Dell has revealed a new mobile program specifically for Meditech.

The "mobile clinical computing" or Meditech MCC program takes the company's Health Care Information Service (HCIS) from a PC-based system to a cloud-enabled one, company officials explain. At the core, the new Dell offering is a virtual desktop that clinicians can log onto through most devices, from laptops to tablets to smartphones, officials say. They also can "move seamlessly" from a desktop to tablet or other hardware, Jim Fitzgerald of Dell's Meditech Solutions group tells InformationWeek.

Dell is selling the new Meditech system as a better way to prevent security breaches, by storing all data centrally, rather than on local hard drives. It's also touting its new "one-touch" roaming and activation function, which it says has cut log-in times to 8 seconds, down from the previous 22 seconds.

Yukon [Canada] Hospital Corp., an early user, says it is implementing the system in large part to reduce its desktop maintenance load--and costs. "Managing clinical and administrative desktops is one of our biggest issues. By implementing MCC for Meditech, we hoped to reduce our help desk calls for our PC clients, as well as provide remote access for physician offices," information systems director Patrick von Wiegen said, according to an announcement.

Dell announced its new virtual service a little less than a month ago. Meditech is its first client, and primary beta tester. Meditech offers a potential market of 2,300 hospital users. We'll be watching to see which other big health IS vendors take the plunge next.

To learn more:
- check out this InformationWeek article
- here's the press release
- learn more about Dell's cloud services

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