Come out and see us this fall at several industry events


I'm taking some much-needed time off next week. Among other things, I'll be gearing up for a lot of travel this fall, including a couple of speaking engagements.

Coming up right after Labor Day, I'll be one of the keynoters at the Second International mHealth Networking Conference in San Diego. Come out and hear me talk about "The Evolution of the Revolution," for which I'll take a look back at m-health developments in my nearly 10 years of covering health IT, and how that history is informing the so-called mobile health revolution. I'm also working to assemble a panel about insurance coverage for home and remote monitoring devices that promise to save money and improve the quality of life for chronically ill people by keeping them out of hospital beds.

Unlike the First International mHealth Networking Conference, held last February in Washington, D.C., I don't expect a blizzard for the ages to prevent people from going home afterward. (I got out just hours ahead of the storm that crippled the region for weeks.)

In mid-October, Fierce healthcare group publisher Wendy Johnson and I are both headed to Las Vegas for the Mobile Health Expo, where we're each tentatively scheduled to moderate panels. We're still working on the details for those sessions, but we've just gotten news in the last few days that the conference, which will be at the massive Las Vegas Convention Center, is growing. Organizers have just added an "App Universe" to showcase dozens of healthcare-specific smartphone app developers, as well as a "University Forum" to highlight medical schools that are making innovative uses of mobile technology.

Come out and see us at one of these events this fall if you can. Mobile healthcare is hot right now, and FierceMobileHealthcare intends to stay on the front lines of the revolution. - Neil

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