AirStrip, mVisum reach settlement over patent infringement lawsuit

San Antonio-based AirStrip and Camden, N.J.-based mVisum have settled AirStrip's patent lawsuit against mVisum, according to an April 29 company announcement.

Under the settlement between the two mHealth companies, mVisum has agreed not to offer products featuring aspects of AirStrip's patented-protected technology, including streaming or displaying real-time or near real-time patient physiological data. In addition, mVisum agreed not to market any products that compress, cache, or buffer patient physiological data in a smartphone or tablet.

As part of the settlement, AirStrip has withdrawn its lawsuit filed in Federal District Court for the Southern District of New York in October 2012. In its legal complaint for patent infringement, AirStrip argued that mVisum violated its patented intellectual property rights involving an "industry-leading" method for remote monitoring of patient medical data on smartphones such as Apple's iPhone, tablets such as Apple's iPad, and other mobile devices.

"Neither party is licensing any intellectual property from the other, and mVisum will continue to sell products without risk of suit from AirStrip so long as it is not practicing any aspects of AirStrip's patented invention," states the AirStrip announcement.

AirStrip obtained a patent in August 2012 for a method of remote monitoring of patient medical data on smartphones, tablets and other mobile devices.

On the same day that AirStrip issued its announcement about the settlement, mVisum announced that it has been granted five patents for various mHealth and hospital workflow technologies.

To learn more:
- read the announcement

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