A primer on mobile healthcare


Last Wednesday, I was a guest of University of Maryland-Baltimore's Health Sciences & Human Services Library, where I delivered the opening keynote for the @Hand symposium on mobile technologies in academia and medicine. It was my first time headlining any event and, incredibly, the first time I'd ever put together a PowerPoint slide deck. Normally, I'm on the other side of the lectern at such conferences.

My presentation, "Healthcare Here, There and Everywhere," was intended to be a broad overview of the mobile healthcare landscape, and by that measure, I think I succeeded. (I haven't seen the attendee evaluations yet.) I'm happy to let you be the judges, too. I've posted my slides on my personal blog and video of my talk and the entire one-day symposium will be up soon on the @Hand web page.

Regular readers of FierceMobileHealthcare will recognize many of the images, articles and concepts that appear in my slides--and not only because I included several FierceMobileHealthcare screen grabs. Remember my original story about mobile teletrauma care that focused on ambulance-based telemedicine systems in Tucson, Ariz., and Baton Rouge, La.? I've included a couple of photos from my February 2009 visit with the Tucson Fire Department's EMS director, Dave Ridings.

I also included some of the original stories that I linked to in FierceMobileHealthcare over the past year. You may recall the phrase, "nana technology" to describe gadgets made for seniors. I've got an informative graphic from USA Today. I threw in some statistics from the likes of Parks Associates, Forrester Research, McKinsey & Co. and the West Wireless Health Institute, as well.

As they say, a picture tells 1,000 words. Some believe a video tells 1 million words. Hopefully, a good slide deck falls somewhere in the middle. - Neil

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