Webcast Available for EHNAC Industry Forum Highlighting Current State of Health Information Exchanges (HIEs)

Jan. 25 webinar examined need for HIE credibility and sustainability

FARMINGTON, Conn.--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- The Electronic Healthcare Network Accreditation Commission (EHNAC), a non-profit standards development organization and accrediting body, today announced that a webcast of the webinar, “Dispelling the Myth that All Health Information Exchanges (HIEs) Are Created Equal”, is now available online at no cost. The webinar examined critical aspects of HIEs and the healthcare industry’s perception of them, such as the value of accreditation, stakeholder trust, economic viability and sustainability, and issues surrounding privacy and security.

Hosted by EHNAC executive director Lee Barrett, the panel of healthcare professionals with extensive expertise in health information exchange, privacy and security and PHI, included:

  • Laura Kolkman, president, Mosaica Partners
  • Jan Root, president and CEO, Utah Health Information Network (UHIN)
  • William O’Byrne, executive director, NJ-HITEC
  • Kate Berry, CEO, National eHealth Collaborative (NeHC)
  • Jennifer Covich Bordenick, CEO, eHealth Initiative (eHI)

“In order to build an HIN, you have to assume that those HIEs have created and implemented standards that live up to the national standard for privacy and security,” William O’Byrne said during his presentation while highlighting the need for HIE accreditation. “Otherwise you’ve got a significant problem because the framework could be built on a loose foundation.”

Panel presenter Laura Kolkman noted that a best practice gauge is necessary to show important decisions made for any HIE result in one that is trustworthy, reliable and serves the community’s best interest.

Jan Root emphasized the crucial need for accreditation when it comes to establishing trust and legitimacy for an HIE since it is a relatively new and unfamiliar concept. “EHNAC accreditation has made a huge difference in answering concerns about UHIN’s privacy and security practices,” she said.

Ensuring HIE sustainability beyond federal and state funding was a topic of discussion during the session. “There are common revenue models across many HIEs that we have profiled,” said presenter Jennifer Covich Bordenick during her presentation. ”Most used membership fees, federal funds and assessment fees; it is important to note that HIEs need to diversify their sources of funding in order to become sustainable.”

Also discussed in the webinar were the ongoing challenges and barriers of HIE adoption. Presenter Kate Berry explained that some of the most significant—and ongoing—issues are the gaps in and variable uses of interoperability standards across the board.

For those interested in the full content of the EHNAC HIE industry forum, please visit EHNAC’s website for webinar slides, complete webcast and more information.

About EHNAC

The Electronic Healthcare Network Accreditation Commission (EHNAC) is a voluntary, self-governing standards development organization (SDO) established to develop standard criteria and accredit organizations that electronically exchange healthcare data. These entities include electronic health networks, payers, financial services firms, health information exchanges, medical billers, outsourced services and e-prescribing solution providers.

EHNAC was founded in 1993 and is a tax-exempt 501(c)(6) nonprofit organization. Guided by peer evaluation, the EHNAC accreditation process promotes quality service, innovation, cooperation and open competition in healthcare. To learn more, visit www.ehnac.org or contact [email protected].



CONTACT:

Dodge Communications
Jennifer Jennings, 770-576-2556
[email protected]
or
EHNAC
Debra Hopkinson, 860-408-1620
[email protected]

KEYWORDS:   United States  North America  Connecticut

INDUSTRY KEYWORDS:   Technology  Data Management  Hardware  Software  Practice Management  Health  Professional Services  Finance  General Health

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